Skip to main content

How to recover a file deleted by SVN if you use Eclipse

If you arrived until here, maybe you have lost a file and you want to recover it, so summon up your patience (and get lucky).

Some days ago I was so happy working with Eclipse writing PHP code when I thought: «This is the moment to commit my work». And I did it.

Usually, making a commit makes your SVN to manage the files, synchronicing the modified ones, and storing the new changes in a secure place. But when more than one person is working on the same file, you have a lot of chances your SVN to become crazy getting in troubles. I lost almost the whole work of this day 🙁

Searching on internet (I can’t remember where) Thanks to Dani Bru and his invaluable help, he found the name of a magic directory where were supposed to rest an automatic set of backups. «Yes… of course!» I thought. I had no hope, but this was the only track to solve the problem, and we get to work.

Apparently, in some obscure and hidden place of your file system, Eclipse makes (at least one) a backup before a commit. And this is how we find the place:

First step

Open your terminal and write:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ updatedb

Be patient, this can take a while. Specially if you never did it before. The command updates the file system index, so we can get an accurate search in the next step. When it finalizes, you won’t get any output, just will return to the console.

Second step

Search the string org.eclipse.core.resources, which is the magic directory that can save our lifes (well, our day):

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ locate org.eclipse.core.resources | grep history
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/24/109601fa0cd800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/24/e077e68009d7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/25/9095cb8d2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/26/40fa905e2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/27/80aeb1582bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2a/20efb2cb11d800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2a/80914b200ed800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2d/f0acb5240fd800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/3/e060608410d800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/32/a0a33f8f0ad80010160af0d88658fae4
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/34/60374f474bd60010182b9a1ddb7c2773
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/34/c04a901b4ad60010182b9a1ddb7c2773
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/36/c0d19b430bd80010160af0d88658fae4
(…)

Third step

Go into the directory relative to your project. Specifically into the .history hidden directory. In this example I will search something about an android project:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ cd /home/pedro/workspace/android/.metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls
0 13 1c 2 24 28 2f 33 38 41 48 4e 52 60 6a 71 7a 7f 84 88 9 9b a3 a9 af b2 b6 be c2 c7 ce da e6 ec f f3 fd 1 16 1d 20 25 2a 3 34 3a 43 49 5 57 61 6e 72 7b 8 85 89 91 9d a4 ab b b3 b7 c c3 c8 d2 db e7 ed f0 f7 10 17 1e 22 26 2b 30 36 3c 44 4a 50 59 63 6f 75 7d 81 86 8a 94 9f a5 ad b0 b4 b8 c0 c5 ca d7 e2 e8 ee f1 f9 12 18 1f 23 27 2d 32 37 3d 45 4c 51 5f 64 7 77 7e 83 87 8d 97 a0 a8 ae b1 b5 b9 c1 c6 cd d9 e3 ea ef f2 fc

Fourth step

Launching a ls, we will get a lot of directory names without any apparent sorting (I couldn’t figure at least). But we can sort them by date with this command:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls -tlahr

This command will show the directories from older to newest (oldest at top of the list, and newest in the bottom). The only thing we can do at this point is look into these directories, starting by the newest one. Maybe some directories are empty, in this case go to the previous one. Being lucky, you will find some directory containing some strange files named like a MD5 hash. Open them and check if they are what you are looking for:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ cd e2
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls -lah
total 20K
drwxr−xr−x   2 pedro pedro 4.0K 2011-09-06 00:30 .
drwxr−xr−x 147 pedro pedro 4.0K 2011-09-06 00:54 ..
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro 1.9K 2011-09-06 00:27 1036c7a60ed800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro  824 2011-09-04 21:14 108c03632ad7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro 1.3K 2011-09-04 21:25 505f6baf2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ gedit * &

If the force is with you, is possible to find your missing files. I got the force with me and I restored the work of my day! 😀

Luck & thanks to Dani who helped me making this story have a happy end!

How to create a mountpoint trough SSH

For console addicted, accessing trough SSH to a server is a really common task. Under my point of view, usually console text editors like vi or nano are not the best option to work with a lot of files at the same time like we can do with any other graphic text editors.
So, I decided to make an internet search to try to find an application able to mount a SSH connection like a standard file system. The application is called sshfs, they didn’t think a lot to get the name 😛
In order to install it, if you use ubuntu, just click on sshfs or write the command below in a terminal:
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo apt-get install sshfs
Once installed, you only need this command to get it work:
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sshfs user@server.com:/my/directory /media/ssh
Where:
  • user, is the name of the SSH user,
  • server.com:, is the name of the server (colon is required)
  • /my/directory, is the remote directory you want to mount, and
  • /media/ssh, is the local directory where the mountpoint will be placed
That’s all, you can now open the directory /media/ssh like any other local directory and open files with your favourite text editor 🙂

Cómo recuperar un archivo eliminado por SVN si usas Eclipse

Si has llegado hasta este post, es más que probable que hayas sufrido la pérdida de un archivo y quieras recuperarlo, así que ármate de paciencia (y suerte).

El otro día estaba yo tan alegre trabajando con mi Eclipse escribiendo en PHP cuando pensé: «Ahora es el momento de hacer un Commit». Así que lo hice.

Lo normal es que al hacer un Commit, el SVN gestione los archivos correctamente y todo se sincronice sin problemas ni conflictos con los ficheros modificados y acabe almacenándose como una modificación válida en un lugar seguro. Pero claro, cuando más de una persona toca el mismo fichero, es más que probable que eso empiece a dar problemas. Yo, perdí prácticamente todo el día de trabajo 🙁

Investigando por internet (no sé exactamente dónde) Gracias a la inestimable ayuda de Dani Bru, que encontró por internet el nombre de un directorio mágico donde se guardan backups automáticos, nos pusimos manos a la obra. Yo pensé, «ya… claro!» No tenía ninguna esperanza, pero era la única pista que tenía para ecuperar lo que se había perdido y estos son los pasos que dí para poder recuperarlo.

Por lo visto, además de la copia remota que se genera al hacer un Commit, en algún lugar oculto de la estructura de directorios que crea Eclipse en local (directorios ocultos y demás cosas), va guardando copias de (al menos) el estado anterior al Commit.

Primer paso

Abrimos el terminal y escribimos:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ updatedb

Es posible que tarde algunos segundos, especialmente si nunca antes lo habías ejecutado. Este comando actualiza el índice de directorios del sistema. De manera que en el siguiente paso nos permitirá realizar una búsqueda de manera más precisa. Cuando acabe el comando, no dará ningún mensaje, tan solo nos devolverá el control del terminal.

Segundo paso

Realizamos la búsqueda de la cadena org.eclipse.core.resources, que al parecer es el directorio mágico que puede salvarnos la vida (bueno, el día).

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ locate org.eclipse.core.resources | grep history
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/24/109601fa0cd800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/24/e077e68009d7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/25/9095cb8d2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/26/40fa905e2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/27/80aeb1582bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2a/20efb2cb11d800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2a/80914b200ed800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/2d/f0acb5240fd800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/3/e060608410d800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/32/a0a33f8f0ad80010160af0d88658fae4
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/34/60374f474bd60010182b9a1ddb7c2773
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/34/c04a901b4ad60010182b9a1ddb7c2773
/some/path/to/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/36/c0d19b430bd80010160af0d88658fae4
(…)

Tercer paso

Entramos en el directorio que haga referencia al proyecto que queremos recuperar información. Más concretamente en el directorio oculto .history. Yo en este ejemplo, buscaré algo del directorio android, en el que estoy trabando:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ cd /home/pedro/workspace/android/.metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.core.resources/.history/
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls
0 13 1c 2 24 28 2f 33 38 41 48 4e 52 60 6a 71 7a 7f 84 88 9 9b a3 a9 af b2 b6 be c2 c7 ce da e6 ec f f3 fd 1 16 1d 20 25 2a 3 34 3a 43 49 5 57 61 6e 72 7b 8 85 89 91 9d a4 ab b b3 b7 c c3 c8 d2 db e7 ed f0 f7 10 17 1e 22 26 2b 30 36 3c 44 4a 50 59 63 6f 75 7d 81 86 8a 94 9f a5 ad b0 b4 b8 c0 c5 ca d7 e2 e8 ee f1 f9 12 18 1f 23 27 2d 32 37 3d 45 4c 51 5f 64 7 77 7e 83 87 8d 97 a0 a8 ae b1 b5 b9 c1 c6 cd d9 e3 ea ef f2 fc

Cuarto paso

Al hacer ls, veremos un montón de directorios con nombres de dos caracteres, sin ningún tipo de orden aparente. Al menos, yo no se lo encontré, pero podemos ordenarlos por fecha de modificación con el siguiente comando:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls -tlahr

Ese comando listará los directorios de más antiguo a más actual. Por lo tanto, sólo deberemos revisar el contenido de los directorios de el más nuevo al más antiguo (de abajo a arriba). Es posible que algunos estén vacíos, pero otros contendrán archivos con nombres que parecen un hash MD5. La única manera de saber el contenido de estos ficheros es editándolos. Veamos cómo:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ cd e2
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ls -lah
total 20K
drwxr−xr−x   2 pedro pedro 4.0K 2011-09-06 00:30 .
drwxr−xr−x 147 pedro pedro 4.0K 2011-09-06 00:54 ..
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro 1.9K 2011-09-06 00:27 1036c7a60ed800101a3dcfaf52c523eb
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro  824 2011-09-04 21:14 108c03632ad7001017b898f7b25b1cbb
−rw−r−−r−−   1 pedro pedro 1.3K 2011-09-04 21:25 505f6baf2bd7001017b898f7b25b1cbb

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ gedit * &

Ahora sólo queda examinar los ficheros para comprobar si este es el directorio que contiene los ficheros que hemos perdido. Si este no es, prueba con el anterior de la lista.

Si tienes algo de suerte, es posible que encuentres lo que necesitas. Yo la tuve y recuperé el trabajo del día. 😀

Suerte y gracias a Dani que hizo que la historia tuviera un final feliz!

Montar una unidad remota a través de SSH

Para los adictos a los terminales, acceder a través de SSH a cualquier servidor está a la orden del día. Hay que reconocer que en muchas ocasiones los editores como vi o nano, se quedan cortos a la hora de trabajar con diferentes ficheros a la vez, tal y como lo hacemos con cualquier otro editor gráfico.
Así que he rebuscado por internet, y he encontrado una aplicación capaz de montar una conexión SSH como si de un sistema de ficheros normal se tratase. La aplicación se llama sshfs, tampoco se han pensado demasiado el nombre 😛
Para instalarlo, si utilizas ubuntu, es tan sencillo como hacer clic en sshfs o escribir en un terminal lo siguiente:
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo apt-get install sshfs
Una vez instalado, sólo hay que lanzar el siguiente comando para usarlo:
pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sshfs usuario@servidor.com:/mi/directorio /media/ssh
Donde:
  • usuario, es el nombre de usuario con el que entrar,
  • servidor.com:, es el dominio del servidor (los dos puntos son necesarios siempre)
  • /mi/directorio, es el directorio remoto que quieres montar
  • /media/ssh, es el directorio local donde se montará el sistema de archivos
Ahora ya podemos usar el directorio /media/ssh como si de un directorio local se tratase y abrir cualquier fichero con el editor que queramos 🙂

Cambiar el día de inicio de semana en Unity y Gnome

Si has instalado la versión de Ubuntu con idioma inglés de Estados Unidos, seguro que el día inicial de la semana es el Domingo, en vez del Lunes, en el applet de calendario. No existe ninguna opción desde donde esto se pueda modificar fácilmente, y hay muchos usuarios (como yo) que están acostumbrados a ver el calendario empezando en Lunes. Esta pequeña guía muestra cómo cambiarlo paso a paso.
  1. Abre tu terminal favorito, y edita el fichero /etc/default/locale
    pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo nano /etc/default/locale
  2. Verás una linea que contiene LANG=»en_US.UTF-8″. A continuación deberás añadir las siguiente lineas, sin borrar la que ya existe:
    LC_TIME=»en_GB.UTF-8″
    LC_PAPER=»en_GB.UTF-8″
    LC_MEASUREMENT=»en_GB.UTF-8

    Guarda los cambios y sal del editor. Con esas opciones, Ubuntu mostrará el formato de fecha en la variante europea del inglés, establecerá el tamaño del papel por defecto en A4 y las medidas en formato métrico.

    Para poder disfrutar de la nueva configuración hay que reiniciar el gestor gráfico. Para hacerlo escribe:

    pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart
Ten cuidado! Al ejecutar el último comando, se reiniciará el demonio gdm, y cerrará todas las aplicaciones. Así que asegúrate de haber guardado tus documentos abiertos antes de hacerlo
Ubuntu Calendar Applet
Calendario empieza en Lunes

Change Gnome and Unity week start day

If you have installed the United States language version of Ubuntu, for sure you have your start week day set to Sunday, instead of Monday, at your calendar applet. There isn’t an option where the user can change this in an user-friendly way, and there are a lot of non-US users (like me) who are used to see the week starting by Monday. This little HOW-TO will show you the way to change it step by step.

  1. Open your favorite terminal application, and edit the file /etc/default/locale
    pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo nano /etc/default/locale
  2. You will se one line containing LANG=»en_US.UTF-8″. Now you have to add the following lines, without removing the first one:
    LC_TIME=»en_GB.UTF-8″
    LC_PAPER=»en_GB.UTF-8″
    LC_MEASUREMENT=»en_GB.UTF-8

    Save the file and exit the editor. With these options, Ubuntu will display the time format in the english european variant, set the default paper size to A4 and set metrics for use with measurements.

  3. In order to start using the new configuration you should restart your graphic desktop manager. Just type this:
    pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart
Take care! Executing the last command will restart your gdm, and will close all running applications. So please, be sure to save your work before doing this.
Ubuntu Calendar Applet
Calendar starting on Monday

Gtk-WARNING **: Locale not supported by C library

Hace ya algunos días que estoy usando Ubuntu 11.04, aunque es una versión beta, funciona muy bien… sólo hay dos cosas que me han hecho perder algo de tiempo mirando por internet cómo solucionarlo. Una de ellas, es un pequeño warning muy molesto que aparece cada vez que lanzo una aplicación gráfica desde el terminal. El error es el siguiente:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ ./cualquier-aplicacion

(process:10945): Gtk-WARNING **: Locale not supported by C library.
Using the fallback ‘C’ locale.

Esto me ha pasado por haber instalado el sistema operativo en inglés en_US, utilizando un teclado en español es_ES. Así que me puse a investigar cómo solucionarlo y siguiendo los siguientes pasos, he conseguido resolverlo:

Lo primero de todo, abrimos un terminal, nos hacemos root y vamos al directorio /var/lib/locales/supported.d/.

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo su
root@pedro-laptop:/home/pedro# cd /var/lib/locales/supported.d/
root@pedro-laptop:/var/lib/locales/supported.d# ls -lah
drwxr−xr−x 2 root root 4,0K 2011-04-25 20:00 .
drwxr−xr−x 3 root root 4,0K 2011-04-13 12:48 ..
−rw−r−−r−− 1 root root  270 2011-04-10 15:16 en
−rw−r−−r−− 1 root root   36 2011-04-25 20:09 local

Allí, en mi caso, existe un archivo llamado en y otro llamado local. Vamos a añadir manualmente el locale es_ES en un archivo llamado es, de la siguiente manera:

root@pedro-laptop:/var/lib/locales/supported.d# echo ‘es_ES.UTF-8 UTF-8’ > es

Comprobamos que se ha añadido bien haciendo un cat:

root@pedro-laptop:/var/lib/locales/supported.d# cat es
es_ES.UTF-8 UTF-8

Ahora añadiremos al locale es_ES en el fichero de locales por defecto. Para ello sólo tenemos que editar el archivo local y poner en la primera línea el locale que nos interesa, de modo que en mi caso queda de la siguiente manera:

root@pedro-laptop:/var/lib/locales/supported.d$ cat local
es_ES.UTF-8 UTF-8
en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8

Y ya está, ahora solo tenemos que reconfigurar el paquete de locales, para que lo reconozca:

root@pedro-laptop:/var/lib/locales/supported.d# dpkg-reconfigure locales
Generating locales…
en_AG.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_AU.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_BW.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_CA.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_DK.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_GB.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_HK.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_IE.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_IN.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_NG.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_NZ.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_PH.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_SG.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_US.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_ZA.UTF-8… up-to-date
en_ZW.UTF-8… up-to-date
es_ES.UTF-8… done
Generation complete.

Fin del problema! Ya no veremos más el molesto Gtk-WARNING 😀

Terminal para Gnome: guake

Hace un tiempo escribí sobre terminales para Gnome en el que hablé de Terminator y Nautilus-terminal, que son dos terminales realmente cómodos para trabajar en modo consola. Aún así, despues del post, seguí probando alguno más y encontré otro que, para mi gusto, es el que más cómodo me resulta de todos. El terminal en cuestión se llama guake y está inspirado en aquellos terminales de míticos juegos como Quake o Doom en los que aparecían desde arriba.

Con tan solo presionar F12, se despliega el terminal y se sitúa por encima de las demás ventanas del escritorio. El terminal es semitransparente por lo que es posible utilizarlo y seguir viendo el contenido del escritorio, muy cómodo cuando necesitas copiar algún texto.

guake screenshot
guake screenshot

Además puedes configurar fácilmente desde los colores del terminal hasta el tipo de shell (sh, dash, bash…) que ejecutará, desde su menú de propiedades para que quede a tu gusto. Incluso tener múltiples pestañas de terminal abiertas a la vez, para realizar diferentes tareas. Me he acostumbrado tanto a este terminal que ahora me resulta imprescindible.

guake múltiples pestañas
guake múltiples pestañas
propiedades de guake
propiedades de guake
propiedades de guake
propiedades de guake

Para instalarlo, como siempre sencillísimo en Ubuntu, tan solo debes ejecutar el siguiente comando:

pedro@pedro-laptop:~$ sudo apt-get install guake

Ni uno ni dos: al menos cinco.

Recientemente llegó a portada una noticia en meneame.net en la que el usuario de flickr dhammza / off (Daniel Horacio Agostini), se enteraba indignado de que La SextaTV, había utilizado una de sus imágenes en flickr sin su permiso, aún cuando la licencia bajo la que está publicada no lo permite. No es la primera vez que cosas así llegan a portada en meneame, ya sucedió algo similar a finales de 2010, esta vez en las noticias de La SextaTV. La verdad es que no tienen perdón, pero no voy a dar ningún sermón sobre nada ya que no soy ningún experto en licencias ni temas legales, sólo quería dejar constancia de lo que de manera anecdótica he encontrado.
Creo que el vídeo en cuestión parece ostentar un récord del que hasta ahora (al menos yo) no tenía constancia. En el vídeo promocional del quinto aniversario de La SextaTV, hay al menos 5 imágenes que son creaciones de usuarios de flickr. Desconozco si todas ellas han sido utilizadas sin el consentimiento de sus respectivos usuarios (como en el caso de Daniel), pero aquí os dejo con el video en cuestión y los enlaces de las imágenes en flickr:

Question mark Empezamos bien. La primera imagen del vídeo es de Marco Belluci y en los 47 segundos del vídeo se repite también en el segundo 0:36. La licencia con la que el autor distribuye la imagen es CC BY 2.0 lo que requiere al menos «reconocer los créditos de la obra» según dicha licencia.
Shore Club En el segundo 0:03, tenemos una imagen de Taylor Davis, distribuida también con la misma licencia que la anterior, y (aparentemente) ni rastro del reconocimiento de su obra.
Following love En el segundo 0:20, como ya conocíamos, está la imagen de Daniel Horacio, cuya licencia CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, permite compartir – copiar y distribuir libremente siempre que se reconozcan los créditos al autor de la obra, no se utilice con fines comerciales ni se cree ninguna obra derivada de la original.
telebasura En el segundo 0:29, la foto que aparece es de Juan Carlos, su nick es po.psi.que en flickr y la licencia de su imagen es CC BY-SA 2.0, que obliga a reconocer los créditos de la imagen utilizada y cuyo uso implica una redistribución de la nueva obra bajo la misma licencia.
Cuero viejo En el segundo 0:34, vemos un balón con un interrogante. La imagen original es de Sergio (su nombre de usuario es sergis blog en flickr) y se publica bajo la licencia CC BY 2.0. Haciendo uso de los derechos que otorga la licencia, han rotado la imagen 90º en sentido antihorario y han modificado la imagen para añadir un interrogante blanco (qué despliegue de conocimientos photoshoperos gimpieros tengo :P), pero aparentemente, saltándose también en este caso la obligación de reconocer los créditos de la obra a su autor.
Que guay es flickr!! ¿Podemos encontrar allí todos los recursos de La SextaTV? A ver si entre todos jugamos al recién inventado juego, llamado «de-quien-es-esta-imagen-en-este-video«. De momento yo gano 5 a 0… ¿Alguien se apunta?

Comandos para comprimir y descomprimir archivos en linux

En Linux hay diversas herramientas para empaquetar y comprimir archivos, tomando en cuenta que empaquetar es juntar dos o más archivos en un solo archivo (paquete) y comprimir es tomar este archivo-paquete y comprimirlo a continuación te muestro un resumen de las más comunes, de acuerdo a la extensión que comunmente se acostumbra ponerles.
.tar (tar)
Empaquetar
tar cvf archivo.tar /archivo/mayo/*
Desempaquetar
tar xvf archivo.tar
Ver el contenido (sin extraer)
tar tvf archivo.tar
.tar.gz – .tar.z – .tgz (tar con gzip)
Empaquetar y comprimir
tar czvf archivo.tar.gz /archivo/mayo/*
Desempaquetar y descomprimir
tar xzvf archivo.tar.gz
Ver el contenido (sin extraer)
tar tzvf archivo.tar.gz
.gz (gzip)
Comprimir
gzip -q archivo
(El archivo lo comprime y lo renombra como «archivo.gz»)
Descomprimir
gzip -d archivo.gz
(El archivo lo descomprime y lo deja como «archivo»
Nota: gzip solo comprime archivos, no directorios
.bz2 (bzip2)
Comprimir

bzip2 archivo

bunzip2 archivo
(El archivo lo comprime y lo renombra como «archivo.bz2»)
Descomprimir

bzip2 -d archivo.bz2

bunzip2 archivo.bz2
(El archivo lo descomprime y lo deja como «archivo»)
Nota: bzip2 solo comprime archivos, no directorios
.tar.bz2 (tar con bzip2)
Comprimir
tar -c archivos | bzip2 > archivo.tar.bz2
Descomprimir

bzip2 -dc archivo.tar.bz2 | tar -xv

tar jvxf archivo.tar.bz2 (versiones recientes de tar)
Ver contenido
bzip2 -dc archivo.tar.bz2 | tar -tv
.zip (zip)
Comprimir
zip archivo.zip /mayo/archivos
Descomprimir
unzip archivo.zip
Ver contenido
unzip -v archivo.zip
.lha (lha)
Comprimir
lha archivo.lha /mayo/archivos
Descomprimir
lha -x archivo.lha
Ver contenido

lha -v archivo.lha

lha -l archivo.lha
.zoo (zoo)
Comprimir
zoo -a archivo.zoo /mayo/archivos
Descomprimir
zoo -x archivo.zoo
Ver contenido

zoo -v archivo.zoo

zoo -L archivo.zoo
.rar (rar)
Comprimir
rar -a archivo.rar /mayo/archivos
Descomprimir
rar -x archivo.rar
Ver contenido

rar -v archivo.rar

rar -l archivo.rar

Fuente original: Sergio González Durán (http://www.linuxtotal.com.mx/index.php?cont=info_admon_004)